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Go String List: Go-String Explained

Table of Contents

Go-string lists are an incredibly useful tool for developers using the Go programming language. They allow for the efficient manipulation and utilization of strings in various ways. In this article, we will discuss what go-strings are and how to work with them in detail. We’ll also cover how to create, manipulate, convert, iterate over, access elements of, and compare go-string lists.

What is a Go-String?

A Go-String is an immutable string type in the Go Programming language. It is similar to other immutable string data types such as C# and Java, but Go-Strings are unique in that they are a sequence of bytes rather than Unicode characters. A Go-String is represented by double quotes around the string enclosed in braces and is not NULL-terminated.

Go-String variables all have to be declared before they can be used. To declare a Go-String, the “var” keyword followed by the Go-String name and a type assertion has to be used. The following is an example of a Go-String declaration:

var s string = “This is my Go-String”

Understanding Go-String Syntax

Basic syntax for a Go-String is very simple. A string is declared with the “var” keyword followed by the Go-String name, then a type assertion. The string then has to follow the provided symbol – usually double quotes. The following is an example of the syntax:

var s string = “This is my Go-String”

Go also supports array syntax and slices for strings, as opposed to single strings. The basic syntax is the same, with the only difference being the addition of a left and right bracket containing the array indices. For example, the following would declare an array of strings:

var arr [3]string = [“This”, “is”, “my”]

Working with Go-String Variables

Go-String variables can be used much like normal string variables in any programming language. They are used to hold text data and can be concatenated together using the “+” operator. The following is an example of concatenation using two string variables:

var s1 = “This” var s2 = “is my Go-String”var s3 = s1 + “ ” + s2  // result: “This is my Go-String”

Go also supports methods for searching strings, replacing characters, removals and extractions, among other features. The following examples show some of these functions in action:

// Finding a character in a string string.index(“Go-String”, ‘o’) // result: 1 // Replacing characters in a string string.replace(“Go-String”, ‘o’, ‘0’) // result: G0-String // Extracting characters from a string string.substring(“Go-String”, 0, 3) // result: Go- 

How to Create a Go-String List

Creating a list of strings in Go is very simple. Lists can be defined with the keyword “var” followed by the list name and array type. The example below shows how to define an array of strings with three elements:

var s []string = [“This”, “is my”, “Go-String List”]

Go also provides developers with built-in methods for creating lists from other types. To convert from a string to a list of strings (or Slice) the “strings.split()” function can be used. It takes a delimiter as its second argument which it uses to split the supplied string into pieces which it then returns as an array of strings.

// Converting from a string to a list of strings strings.split(“This is my Go-String List”, “ ”) // result: [“This”, “is”, “my”, “Go-String”, “List”]

Manipulating Go-String Lists

Go provides developers with several built-in methods for manipulating lists of strings, such as appending elements to the end of a list or flattening (or concatenating) multiple lists into one. To append an element to the end of a list or array, the “append()” function can be used. This takes one or more elements, which it adds to the end of the list or array.

// Appending an element to a list s := []string{“This”, “is my”, “Go-String List”} s = append(s, “adding this element!”) // result: [“This”, “is my”, “Go-String List”, “adding this element!”]

To flatten multiple lists into one, the “flatten()” function can be used. This takes multiple slices and combines them into one, resulting in the elements of all the slices being concatenated into one single slice.

// Flattening multiple slices into one s1 := []string{“This”} s2 := []string{“is my”} s3 := []string{“Go-String List!”} s := flatten(s1, s2, s3) // result: [“This is my Go-String List!”] 

Accessing Elements of a Go-String List

Go provides developers with several methods for accessing elements from string lists at various points in the list. To access an element at any point in the list, the “getElement()” method can be used. This method takes an index as its first argument and returns the element at that point.

// Accessing an element from within a list s := []string{“This”, “is my”, “Go-String List!”} element := getElement(s, 2) // result: “Go-String List!” 

Additionally, elements can be accessed at specific points in the list using either the “start()” or the “end()” methods. These methods take two arguments – start or end index – and return either the first or last element in the list respectively.

// Accessing elements at specific points in a list s := []string{“This”, “is my”, “Go-String List!”}  // Retrieve first element   start := getStart(s) // result: “This"  // Retrieve last element   end := getEnd(s) // result: “Go-String List!” 

Comparing Go-String List Values

Comparing multiple strings in Go is very easy – developers can use either the built-in comparison operators or they can use some of the specialized functions provided by the language. To compare two strings using operators simply use either == or != depending on what comparison you wish to make. The following example shows how this can be done:

// Compare two strings using operators  a := "This"   b := "That"   if a == b {   // Do something    } else {   // Do something else    } 

For more advanced comparisons – such as checking if one string is contained within another – developers can use specialized functions such as “contains()” or “startsWith()/endsWith()”. These functions are used to check if a string contains another or if one string starts/ends with another respectively.

// Check if one string contains another   str := "foo bar baz"   if contains(str, "bar") {   // Do something    } else {   // Do something else    } ------// Check if one string starts or ends with another   str := "My Go-String List"   if startsWith(str, "My") {   // Do something    } else if endsWith(str,"List") {   // Do something else    } 

Iterating over Go-String Lists

Iterating (or looping) over a Go-String list is done using either the for loop or range functions provided by the language. Both functions allow for iterating over all elements in a list. To loop over each element in a the following example shows how this can be done using range:

// Iterate over each element in a string list s := []string{ "This", "is my", "Go-String List!" } for idx, val := range s { fmt.Println("Index", idx,"Value",val) } // Index 0 Value This // Index 1 Value is my // Index 2 Value Go-String List! 

Converting Other Types to and from a Go-String List

Go provides developers with several methods for converting between various types such as integers, floats and other data types. To convert from any other type to a string list, developers can use either the built-in comma operator or the join() function provided by Go.

// Using comma operator s := []string{ "One", "two", "three" } s = append(s, 3) // result: ["One", "two", "three", "3"] ------// Using join() function intArr := [3]int{1, 2, 3} strArr := strings.Join(intArr,",") // result: "1,2,3" 

Common Uses of Go-String Lists

Go-String lists are incredibly useful for several uses such as holding multiple lines of text in a single variable or converting between different types. Additionally, they are commonly used for manipulating text data – such as transforming lowercase text into all uppercase – and for checking if certain conditions are met such as checking if one string begins with another.

In conclusion, no matter what use any developer has for text data, Go-Strings are incredibly versatile and easy to use data structures that allow for quick and effortless manipulation of text data.

Anand Das

Anand Das

Anand is Co-founder and CTO of Bito. He leads technical strategy and engineering, and is our biggest user! Formerly, Anand was CTO of Eyeota, a data company acquired by Dun & Bradstreet. He is co-founder of PubMatic, where he led the building of an ad exchange system that handles over 1 Trillion bids per day.

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