Faster, better AI-powered code reviews. Start your free trial!  
Faster, better AI-powered code reviews.
Start your free trial!

Get high quality AI code reviews

Java Bigdecimal Example: Java Explained

Table of Contents

Java is a popular and widely used language but it can be difficult for beginners to understand and work with profitably without knowledge. One such area of Java that some developers overlook is Bigdecimal, a Java class for representing precise decimal numbers. This article will explain what a Bigdecimal is, how it works, and provide several examples of using Bigdecimal in Java development. After reading this article you will have a better understanding of Bigdecimal and how to use it in your own Java projects.

What is a BigDecimal in Java?

BigDecimal is a class in the Java Development Kit (JDK) that allows developers to represent and manipulate precise decimal numbers with high accuracy. The BigDecimal class extends the Number class and overrides methods like equals(), compareTo(), toString(), and more. It also supports mathematical operations like addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and rounding functions. BigDecimal offers several advantages over primitive float and double data types when dealing with highly precise numbers.

One of the main advantages of using BigDecimal is that it allows developers to control the precision of the numbers they are working with. This is especially useful when dealing with financial calculations, where accuracy is of the utmost importance. Additionally, BigDecimal is immutable, meaning that it cannot be changed once it has been created. This makes it a safe choice for use in multi-threaded applications, as it eliminates the possibility of race conditions.

Using BigDecimal in Java

Using BigDecimal in Java is quite simple. The class offers both static factory methods and primitive constructors to create new instances of the class. The bigDecimal() method can be used to create a new instance from a literal number. Alternatively, constructors exist for creating instances from Integer, Long, Double and Float values. The setScale() method is used to specify decimal places.

The BigDecimal class also provides a range of arithmetic operations, such as add(), subtract(), multiply() and divide(). These methods can be used to perform calculations on BigDecimal objects. Additionally, the class provides a range of comparison methods, such as compareTo(), equals() and min(). These methods can be used to compare two BigDecimal objects.

How to Convert String to BigDecimal

The BigDecimal class provides additional methods to convert Strings to BigDecimal objects. There is the valueOf() method, which can be used to parse a String and create a new BigDecimal instance. There is also the new BigDecimal(String) constructor which can be used to do the same thing. Additionally, there are several methods to convert BigDecimal objects into other numeric data types.

For example, the BigDecimal class provides the doubleValue() and floatValue() methods to convert a BigDecimal object into a double or float, respectively. Similarly, the intValue() and longValue() methods can be used to convert a BigDecimal object into an int or long, respectively. Finally, the BigDecimal class also provides the toString() method to convert a BigDecimal object into a String.

Working with Precise Decimals Using the BigDecimal Class

BigDecimal objects are not sequences of binary values like float or double, so representing and manipulating decimals is much simpler. When working with large numbers having exact decimal points is often important for accuracy, and this can be done using the BigDecimal APIs. The add(), subtract(), multiply(), divide() and other related methods are all present and provide math operations that produce exact results.

The BigDecimal class also provides a number of other useful methods, such as the setScale() method which allows you to set the number of decimal places to be used in calculations. This is especially useful when dealing with large numbers, as it allows you to control the level of precision used in calculations. Additionally, the BigDecimal class also provides methods for rounding numbers, such as the round() method which rounds a number to the nearest integer.

Comparison of float and double with a BigDecimal

When it comes to comparing the primitive float and double data types with BigDecimal it’s important to understand the difference. Float and double represent real numbers as sequences of binary numbers and have limited precision. As a result, operations with floats and doubles often produce slightly inaccurate results. BigDecimal, on the other hand, is an object-oriented class that represents numbers as exact decimal values, producing results that are guaranteed to be accurate.

The main advantage of using BigDecimal is that it allows for greater precision when dealing with decimal numbers. This is especially important when dealing with financial calculations, as even small inaccuracies can lead to significant discrepancies. Additionally, BigDecimal is immutable, meaning that it can be used in multi-threaded applications without the need for synchronization.

Advantages of Using the BigDecimal Class

The primary advantage of using the BigDecimal class over primitive numeric data types like float and double is accuracy. As long as the appropriate precision settings are used, the results produced by the class will always be accurate regardless of how large the numbers being manipulated are. Additionally, BigDecimal’s methods often provide additional control over the way calculations are done and improved performance.

Another advantage of using the BigDecimal class is that it allows for more flexibility when dealing with large numbers. For example, it can be used to represent numbers with a large number of decimal places, which is not possible with primitive data types. Additionally, it can be used to represent numbers with a large number of significant digits, which is also not possible with primitive data types.

Examples of Working with the BigDecimal Class

Let’s take a look at some examples of working with the BigDecimal class in Java. We’ll start with a simple example of creating a new BigDecimal instance from a literal value:

BigDecimal number = new BigDecimal('100.50'); 

This line of code creates a new instance of the BigDecimal class from the literal value ‘100.50’. We can then apply various methods to the instance to manipulate or convert it:

int intValue = number.intValue();    //outputs 100 double doubleValue = number.doubleValue();   //outputs 100.50 

In this example we use intValue() and doubleValue() methods to convert our BigDecimal instance into int and double values respectively.

We can also use the BigDecimal class to perform mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. For example, to add two BigDecimal instances together, we can use the add() method:

BigDecimal number1 = new BigDecimal('100.50'); BigDecimal number2 = new BigDecimal('50.25'); BigDecimal result = number1.add(number2); //outputs 150.75 

In this example, we create two BigDecimal instances and use the add() method to add them together. The result is a new BigDecimal instance with the value of 150.75.

Limitations of Using the BigDecimal Class

Though very helpful in manipulating extremely large or small numbers in Java, there are several limitations when working with BigDecimals. The most notable limitations are memory usage and performance. Because BigDecimals are objects and not primitive data types, they require more memory than primitive data types such as float or double. Additionally, operations with them typically take longer than operations performed on primitive data types.

By understanding what BigDecimals are and how they work, you can now use them more effectively in your Java projects or applications to accurately manipulate decimal numbers of any size.

It is important to note that BigDecimals are immutable, meaning that any operation performed on them will create a new object, rather than modifying the existing object. This can lead to a large number of objects being created, which can cause memory and performance issues. Therefore, it is important to be aware of this limitation when using BigDecimals.

Sarang Sharma

Sarang Sharma

Sarang Sharma is Software Engineer at Bito with a robust background in distributed systems, chatbots, large language models (LLMs), and SaaS technologies. With over six years of experience, Sarang has demonstrated expertise as a lead software engineer and backend engineer, primarily focusing on software infrastructure and design. Before joining Bito, he significantly contributed to Engati, where he played a pivotal role in enhancing and developing advanced software solutions. His career began with foundational experiences as an intern, including a notable project at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, to develop an assistive website for the visually challenged.

Written by developers for developers

This article was handcrafted with by the Bito team.

Latest posts

Mastering Python’s writelines() Function for Efficient File Writing | A Comprehensive Guide

Understanding the Difference Between == and === in JavaScript – A Comprehensive Guide

Compare Two Strings in JavaScript: A Detailed Guide for Efficient String Comparison

Exploring the Distinctions: == vs equals() in Java Programming

Understanding Matplotlib Inline in Python: A Comprehensive Guide for Visualizations

Top posts

Mastering Python’s writelines() Function for Efficient File Writing | A Comprehensive Guide

Understanding the Difference Between == and === in JavaScript – A Comprehensive Guide

Compare Two Strings in JavaScript: A Detailed Guide for Efficient String Comparison

Exploring the Distinctions: == vs equals() in Java Programming

Understanding Matplotlib Inline in Python: A Comprehensive Guide for Visualizations

Get Bito for IDE of your choice