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Java Calender Example: Java Explained

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Java is one of the most popular programming languages used today, and learning how to program in Java can open many opportunities in the tech sector. One of the essential features that Java has is the Java Calendar, which allows developers and users to handle date and time processing with relative ease. This article will go into detail about what the Java Calendar is, its advantages, how to use it, and provide examples of how to use it.

Overview of Java Calendar

Java Calendar is part of the Java Standard Edition (SE), a set of libraries provided by Oracle when downloading the Java Development Kit (JDK). It basically provides a set of classes that give users access to time-related data like hours, minutes, and seconds. It also enables them to produce, or store and convert dates and times for any given locale. Java Calendar also supports other aspects such as internationalization and multi-language support, which makes it applicable to a variety of different applications.

The Java Calendar class is an abstract class that provides methods for converting between a specific instant in time and a set of calendar fields such as YEAR, MONTH, DAY_OF_MONTH, HOUR, and so on, and for manipulating the calendar fields, such as getting the date of the next week. It also provides additional fields and methods for implementing a concrete calendar system outside the scope of the Java platform.

What is Java Calendar?

The Java Calendar class is a fundamental part of the JDK and the Java SE. It’s designed to let developers to create, manipulate, and interpret dates and times. The class lets us handle common tasks such as calculations involving dates, differences between dates, comparisons between dates, and conversion between calendars and epochs. It also includes features such as time zone support, locale support, globalized calendar support, and more.

The Java Calendar class is an abstract class, meaning that it cannot be instantiated directly. Instead, developers must use one of the subclasses such as GregorianCalendar, BuddhistCalendar, or JapaneseImperialCalendar. Each of these subclasses provides a different calendar system, allowing developers to choose the one that best suits their needs.

Advantages of Using Java Calendar

The most obvious advantage of using the Java Calendar class is that it provides an easy way to handle dates and times. By using the classes present in the Calendar package, developers can get up to speed quickly when dealing with date and time-related tasks. Other advantages include access to calendar fields, time zone-aware calculations, internationalization support, correct date adjustment for daylight savings time, custom date formats, and date conversions between different calendars.

The Java Calendar class also offers a range of useful methods for manipulating dates and times. For example, the add() and roll() methods can be used to add or roll a specified amount of time to a given date. Additionally, the getTime() and setTime() methods can be used to get or set the time of a given date. Finally, the getActualMaximum() and getActualMinimum() methods can be used to get the maximum or minimum values for a given field of a given date.

How to Use Java Calendar

Using the Java Calendar class is relatively straightforward. The first step is to create a Calendar object. This is done by calling the static method getInstance() with no parameters. After that, you can access the fields and components of the calendar object using get(). From there, you can manipulate dates and times such as adding days or subtracting weeks. You can also use set() to change a specific field like day of month.

In addition to the methods mentioned above, the Java Calendar class also provides a variety of other useful methods. For example, you can use the getTime() method to get the current date and time as a Date object. You can also use the add() method to add a specified amount of time to the calendar. Finally, you can use the roll() method to roll the calendar forward or backward by a specified amount of time.

Creating a Calendar Object

Creating a Calendar object is done by calling the static function getInstance(). This function returns a new instance of a calendar object that has already been initialized with the current date and time. The constructor for this object takes no parameters.

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();System.out.println(calendar);

This will print out something like java.util.GregorianCalendar[time=1592639401719,areFieldsSet=true,areAllFieldsSet=true,lenient=true,zone=sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="America/Los_Angeles",offset=-25200000,dstSavings=3600000,useDaylight=true,transitions=185,lastRule=java.util.SimpleTimeZone[id=America/Los_Angeles,offset=-25200000,dstSavings=3600000,useDaylight=true,startYear=0,startMode=3,startMonth=2,startDay=8,startDayOfWeek=1,startTime=7200000,startTimeMode=0,endMode=3,endMonth=10,endDay=1,endDayOfWeek=1,endTime=7200000,endTimeMode=0]],firstDayOfWeek=1,minimalDaysInFirstWeek=1,ERA=1,YEAR=2020,MONTH=6,WEEK_OF_YEAR=27,WEEK_OF_MONTH=4,DAY_OF_MONTH=17,DAY_OF_YEAR=199,DAY_OF_WEEK=6,DAY_OF_WEEK_IN_MONTH=3,AM_PM=1,HOUR=10,HOUR_OF_DAY=22,MINUTE=45,SECOND=1,MILLISECOND=719,ZONE_OFFSET=-25200000,DST_OFFSET=3600000]

Accessing Calendar Fields and Components

After you have created your calendar object, you can access its fields and components by using the appropriate methods. For example, for accessing the hour and minute components of the date and time you can use the following:

int hour = calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR); int minute = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);System.out.println("Hour: " +hour+ "\\nMinute: "+minute);

This will return something like:
Hour: 10
Minute: 45
You can also use the getTime() function to get a Date object representation of the calendar.

Working with Date and Time in Java

Once you have created your calendar object and accessed its fields and components you can work with it by using different methods such as add(), set(), roll(), etc. For example:

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();cal.add(Calendar.DATE, 14); //Add 14 days to current date cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); //Set hour to 00 cal.roll(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 12); //Roll 12 weeks from current date

This will add 14 days to the current date and set the hour to 00 and roll 12 weeks from the current date.

Customizing Date and Time Formatting

The Java SE provides different classes such as SimpleDateFormat, DateFormat, etc., which provide powerful features for formatting dates and times according to user preferences. The SimpleDateFormat class is particularly useful as it lets you create custom patterns for representing dates and times according to predefined codes.

//Create a SimpleDateFormat object SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");     //Get current date Date currentDate = new Date();     //Format current date String formattedCurrentDate = sdf.format(currentDate);     System.out.println(formattedCurrentDate);

This will print out something like 17/07/2020. You can also use this class to parse strings containing dates into Date objects.

Setting Time Zones with Java Calendar

The Java Calendar class also provides support for setting time zones for dates and times. Setting time zones can be tricky if you don’t know what you’re doing as there are many different time zones around the world and if you don’t set them correctly your application will show wrong dates and times. There are several ways to set time zones in Java but the most straightforward way is to use the Calendar#setTimeZone(), which takes a TimeZone object as a parameter. For example:

TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/Los_Angeles"); calendar.setTimeZone(tz);

Using Globalization Support in the Java Calender

The Java Calender supports globalization by providing locale-specific calendar systems such as Bikram Sambat (Nepali), Buddhist Era (Thai), Chinese Lunar Calendars (Hong Kong), Julian Day Number (India), etc., which allow users to parse dates in different formats according to their region or culture.

Examples of Java Calender Usage

As mentioned above, the Java Calendar class provides a lot of features that make it a great tool when dealing with date/time-related tasks such as time zone conversions, date formatting, retrieving days or months from a given date/time string, date calculations such as finding out if one date is after another date etc., time zone-aware calculations etc.

Summary

In this article we have gone over what the Java Calendar class is and its advantages. We have also shown how to create a calendar object in Java and access its properties as well as how to set time zones in Java using the Calendar#setTimeZone(), provided examples of how it can be used effectively in real life scenarios, and offered tips on globalization support in the class.

Sarang Sharma

Sarang Sharma

Sarang Sharma is Software Engineer at Bito with a robust background in distributed systems, chatbots, large language models (LLMs), and SaaS technologies. With over six years of experience, Sarang has demonstrated expertise as a lead software engineer and backend engineer, primarily focusing on software infrastructure and design. Before joining Bito, he significantly contributed to Engati, where he played a pivotal role in enhancing and developing advanced software solutions. His career began with foundational experiences as an intern, including a notable project at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, to develop an assistive website for the visually challenged.

Written by developers for developers

This article was handcrafted with by the Bito team.

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