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Java Enumset Example: Java Explained

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As a powerful programming language, Java is capable of handling complex data structures with ease. One such data structure is EnumSet, which combines the convenience of collection classes with the power of enums to create a powerful, resource-efficient data structure. In this article, we will take a look at what an Enumset is, how to create and manipulate an Enumset in Java, and conclude with an example of how Java’s Enumset data structure can be implemented in real code. So without further ado, let’s get started!

What is an Enumset in Java?

An Enumset is a specialized implementation of the Set interface in Java. It is an ultra-efficient implementation of a set whose elements are all of the same type – known as the “Enum” type – and which is backed by an array of bytes. Because of this array of bytes, Enumsets can take advantage of direct indexing and can outshine traditional Set implementations for the storage of values of the same type.

Enumsets are also useful for representing a finite set of values, such as a set of days of the week or a set of months in a year. They are also useful for representing a set of constants, such as a set of colors or a set of directions. Enumsets are also useful for representing a set of flags, such as a set of permissions or a set of options.

Creating an Enumset in Java

The easiest way to create an Enumset in Java is using the ?of? method, which takes a variable number of arguments of the specified Enum type, and returns a Set implementation containing those values. To illustrate the syntax, here’s an example:

EnumSet<MyEnumType> myEnumSet = EnumSet.of(MyEnumType.VALUE_ONE, MyEnumType.VALUE_TWO);

Another way to create an Enumset is using the ?allOf? method. This method takes a single argument of the specified Enum type, and returns a Set implementation containing all possible values:

EnumSet<MyEnumType> myEnumSet = EnumSet.allOf(MyEnumType.class);

It is also possible to create an Enumset using the ?copyOf? method. This method takes a single argument of the specified Enum type, and returns a Set implementation containing the same values as the argument:

EnumSet<MyEnumType> myEnumSet = EnumSet.copyOf(MyEnumType.class);

Adding Elements to an Enumset

To add elements to an existing Enumset, simply use the ?add? method, passing in the value to be added:

myEnumSet.add(MyEnumType.VALUE_THREE);

It is also possible to add multiple elements at once by passing in an array or collection of values. For example:

myEnumSet.addAll(Arrays.asList(MyEnumType.VALUE_FOUR, MyEnumType.VALUE_FIVE));

Removing Elements from an Enumset

To remove elements from an existing Enumset, use the ?remove? method. Depending on the number of elements being removed, either a single element can be removed or multiple elements can be removed at once:

myEnumSet.remove(MyEnumType.VALUE_FOUR); //or myEnumSet.removeAll(Arrays.asList(MyEnumType.VALUE_FIVE, MyEnumType.VALUE_SIX));

It is important to note that the ?remove? method will return a boolean value indicating whether or not the element was successfully removed. If the element was not found in the Enumset, the method will return false.

Sorting the Contents of an Enumset

By default, the elements of an Enumset are stored in their natural order, which is usually the order they were added to the set. However, it’s possible to sort an Enumset using the ?sort? method. This method takes a comparator as an argument, which is used to determine the order in which elements are returned.

myEnumSet.sort(Comparator.reverseOrder());

The Comparator.reverseOrder() method is used to sort the elements in reverse order, from highest to lowest. It’s also possible to create a custom comparator to sort the elements in any order you choose. This can be useful if you need to sort the elements in a specific way for a particular application.

Iterating Over the Contents of an Enumset

Iterating over the contents of an Enumset is easy with the support of the Iterator interface. An Iterator object can be obtained from the ?iterator? method, and can be used to loop over the elements in the set using a while loop structure:

Iterator<MyEnumType> iterator = myEnumSet.iterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()) {    MyEnumType element = iterator.next();    // do something with element }

It is also possible to iterate over the elements of an Enumset using the for-each loop structure. This is a more concise way of looping over the elements of the set, and can be used as follows:

for (MyEnumType element : myEnumSet) {    // do something with element }

Converting an Enumset to a List

If it’s necessary to convert an Enumset to a List, this can easily be done using the ?asList? method. This method takes no arguments and returns a List containing all the elements of the Enumset:

List<MyEnumType> enumList = myEnumSet.asList();

It is important to note that the List returned by the ?asList? method is a fixed-size List, meaning that it cannot be modified. Any attempts to add or remove elements from the List will result in an UnsupportedOperationException being thrown.

Conclusion

This article has explored Java’s powerful Enumset data structure. We looked at how to create and manipulate Enumsets in Java, as well as how to sort them, iterate over them, and even convert them to Lists for further processing. With this knowledge of Java’s native Enumsets, you should have no trouble implementing this powerful resource-saving data structure in your real-life Java applications.

Enumsets are a great way to store and manipulate data in Java, as they are lightweight and efficient. They are also easy to use and understand, making them a great choice for developers of all levels. With the knowledge gained from this article, you should now be able to confidently use Enumsets in your Java applications.

Anand Das

Anand Das

Anand is Co-founder and CTO of Bito. He leads technical strategy and engineering, and is our biggest user! Formerly, Anand was CTO of Eyeota, a data company acquired by Dun & Bradstreet. He is co-founder of PubMatic, where he led the building of an ad exchange system that handles over 1 Trillion bids per day.

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