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Native Javascript: Javascript Explained

Table of Contents

Native JavaScript (JS) is a dynamic, general-purpose programming language that enables developers to develop websites, web applications and mobile applications. It was developed, and is maintained, by a committee of professionals representing a variety of web browser manufacturers. It is one of the three core technologies of web development alongside HTML and CSS. Native JavaScript is the language of the web and has grown to become the most popular programming language in the world.

What is Native Javascript?

Native JavaScript is a cross-platform, object-oriented scripting language that is used to create dynamic web pages, web applications and mobile applications. It was designed as a lightweight, interpreted language that can easily be embedded into larger programming projects. Native JavaScript is known for its reliability, speed and security.

Native JavaScript lets you do more with less code than other popular scripting languages like Java and C#. It is a prototype-based language, meaning you can use functions as simple templates to create custom objects with specific characteristics. Native JavaScript is also an asynchronous language, which allows it to execute multiple tasks in parallel without waiting for one task to finish before starting another.

Native JavaScript is a powerful language that can be used to create complex applications. It is also easy to learn and use, making it a great choice for developers of all skill levels. With its wide range of features and capabilities, Native JavaScript is an excellent choice for creating dynamic web applications and mobile applications.

How Does Native Javascript Work?

Native JavaScript code is run through a browser’s interpreter or engine which executes it line-by-line. As the code is run through the interpreter, the browser renders the corresponding web page or mobile application. Native JavaScript can be used both in the client-side of web development as well as the server-side. On the client-side, it is used for things such as form validation, communication with web services and manipulating the Document Object Model (DOM) of a page. On the server-side, it is often used for creating web services or Node.js applications.

Native JavaScript is a powerful tool for web developers, as it allows them to create dynamic and interactive web pages and applications. It is also a great way to create cross-platform applications, as it can be used on both desktop and mobile devices. Additionally, it is relatively easy to learn and use, making it a great choice for developers of all skill levels.

Benefits of Using Native Javascript

Native JavaScript has grown in popularity due to its relatively simple syntax and powerful features. It runs cross-platform, so it can be used on any operating system or browser. Native JavaScript also offers high performance, as code is compiled into a low-level language that runs quickly in most browsers. Its flexibility makes it possible to use browser features quickly and easily with minimal code, allowing for rapid development.

In addition, native JavaScript is highly secure, as it is not subject to the same vulnerabilities as other scripting languages. It also has a wide range of libraries and frameworks available, making it easy to find the right tools for any project. Finally, native JavaScript is open source, meaning it is free to use and modify, making it an ideal choice for developers of all skill levels.

Disadvantages of Using Native Javascript

Native JavaScript can be difficult to debug due to its asynchronous nature. Also, since there is no official standardization of the language, cross-browser compatibility can be an issue. For example, JavaScript code written for Chrome may not work as expected in Firefox. Finally, due to its dynamic and loose typing, errors in code may not appear until runtime.

In addition, native JavaScript can be difficult to maintain over time. As the codebase grows, it can become increasingly difficult to keep track of all the different functions and variables. This can lead to code that is difficult to read and understand, making it difficult to make changes or add new features.

The Difference Between Native Javascript and Other Popular JavaScript Frameworks

Native JavaScript is different from other popular JavaScript frameworks like Angular, React and Vue. These frameworks are built on top of Native JavaScript and they provide additional features such as templating, state management and interactive interfaces. However, they are not required to build basic web pages or simple web applications.

Native JavaScript is a great choice for developers who want to create simple web applications without the need for additional frameworks. It is also a great choice for developers who want to learn the fundamentals of JavaScript before diving into more complex frameworks. Native JavaScript is also a great choice for developers who want to create applications that are lightweight and fast.

Overview of Native Javascript Syntax & Structure

The syntax of Native JavaScript is similar to that of other popular programming languages like Java and C#. It supports common programming constructs such as variables, functions and classes. It also uses an event-driven model which allows code to react to user actions and external events.

Native JavaScript code is organized into top-level objects that contain related functions and properties. For example, a document object contains functions for manipulating the DOM tree, window objects contain functions for managing windows and a console object contains functions for printing messages to the console.

Native JavaScript also supports object-oriented programming, which allows developers to create complex applications with a modular structure. This makes it easier to maintain and extend code, as well as to reuse code in different projects. Additionally, Native JavaScript is highly extensible, allowing developers to add custom functions and objects to the language.

Best Practices for Writing Native Javascript Code

To produce robust and maintainable code, developers should adhere to best practices when writing Native JavaScript code. These include minimizing global scope, avoiding global variables and functions, avoiding magic numbers (hardcoded values) and using descriptive names for variables.

Developers should also consider using good formatting practices such as indenting code blocks and whitespace. This makes code easier to read and understand, leading to fewer errors. Additionally, using object-oriented programming techniques such as abstract classes or data encapsulation can reduce complexity and improve code readability.

It is also important to use comments in code to explain the purpose of the code and any assumptions that have been made. This can help other developers understand the code more quickly and reduce the time spent debugging. Finally, developers should use version control systems such as Git to track changes to the code and ensure that any changes are properly tested before being deployed.

Tips and Tricks for Debugging Native Javascript Applications

Debugging Native JavaScript applications can be difficult due to its asynchronous nature. To debug your code, you should use a debugger to set breakpoints, including line breakpoints, watchpoints and call stack breakpoints. This will allow you to inspect the values of different variables in your code.

You can also use the console object to print out messages that help track down errors. Additionally, you should avoid making global changes to your code while debugging as this can make it more difficult to track down errors.

Conclusion

Native JavaScript is a powerful language for building websites, web applications and mobile applications. It offers a lot of features such as flexibility, cross-platform support and high performance. It has some disadvantages such as difficulty debugging and lack of standardized implementation across browsers. However, if you follow best practices when writing code and debug carefully, these issues can be managed.

Sarang Sharma

Sarang Sharma

Sarang Sharma is Software Engineer at Bito with a robust background in distributed systems, chatbots, large language models (LLMs), and SaaS technologies. With over six years of experience, Sarang has demonstrated expertise as a lead software engineer and backend engineer, primarily focusing on software infrastructure and design. Before joining Bito, he significantly contributed to Engati, where he played a pivotal role in enhancing and developing advanced software solutions. His career began with foundational experiences as an intern, including a notable project at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, to develop an assistive website for the visually challenged.

Written by developers for developers

This article was handcrafted with by the Bito team.

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