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Quick Sort in C: Efficient Sorting for Optimized Performance

Table of Contents

Quick sort, a highly efficient sorting algorithm, stands out due to its divide-and-conquer approach. This article delves into implementing quick sort in C, highlighting its efficiency and optimal performance in sorting data.

Understanding the Quick Sort Mechanism

Quick sort operates by selecting a ‘pivot’ element from the array and partitioning the other elements into two sub-arrays, according to whether they are less than or greater than the pivot. The sub-arrays are then sorted recursively.

Implementing Quick Sort in C

The implementation of quick sort in C involves two primary functions: partition() and quickSort(). Here’s a detailed breakdown:

The partition() Function

int partition(int arr[], int low, int high) {
    int pivot = arr[high];  
    int i = (low - 1);

    for (int j = low; j <= high- 1; j++) {
        if (arr[j] < pivot) {
            i++;
            swap(&arr[i], &arr[j]);
        }
    }
    swap(&arr[i + 1], &arr[high]);
    return (i + 1);
}

The quickSort() Function

void quickSort(int arr[], int low, int high) {
    if (low < high) {
        int pi = partition(arr, low, high);

        quickSort(arr, low, pi - 1);
        quickSort(arr, pi + 1, high);
    }
}

Auxiliary swap() Function

void swap(int* a, int* b) {
    int t = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = t;
}

Key Features of Quick Sort

  1. Divide and Conquer Strategy: Splits the array and sorts the sub-arrays.
  2. In-Place Sorting: Does not require additional space.
  3. Time Complexity: Average and best case – O(n log n), worst case – O(n^2).

Conclusion

Quick sort in C offers a blend of efficiency and speed, making it a go-to choice for sorting large datasets. Understanding and implementing this algorithm enhances your skill set in data structure management and algorithm optimization.

Nisha Kumari

Nisha Kumari

Nisha Kumari, a Founding Engineer at Bito, brings a comprehensive background in software engineering, specializing in Java/J2EE, PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and web development. Her career highlights include significant roles at Accenture, where she led end-to-end project deliveries and application maintenance, and at PubMatic, where she honed her skills in online advertising and optimization. Nisha's expertise spans across SAP HANA development, project management, and technical specification, making her a versatile and skilled contributor to the tech industry.

Written by developers for developers

This article was handcrafted with by the Bito team.

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